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If you want to write to us to submit evidence or have any other enquiries, please contact: info@theicec.com

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Our Story

In the wake of global movements such as Black Lives Matter and Me-Too organisations across the globe were prompted to rethink their role in tackling prejudice and upholding equity. Both within the world of cricket and wider society, the murder of George Floyd in May 2020 was pivotal in sparking mass conversations about racism and prompting actions to address it. Several individuals both formerly and currently engaged in cricket publicly opened up about their experiences of discrimination and racism within the game.

It is from this driving force that examining race in cricket will be at the heart of our Commission, in combination with exploring pressing issues of equity regarding gender and class.

Through providing a platform to those who have faced inequity in cricket, we aim to provide experience led recommendations to the ECB to change cricket for the better. This will be a 12 month Commission that will report on its final findings and make recommendations to the ECB in summer 2022. The Commission’s final report and recommendations will be published and made available to the public.

Timeline

June 2020

Former England Captain Clare Connor announced to become the MCC’s first female President in its 233 year history. She will take her position as the next President in October 2021.

Clare Connor

November 2020

ECB announces actions to be taken as part of their new Equality, Diversity and Inclusion Plan, including to establish the ICEC to make cricket more representative and tackle issues of discrimination. Other measures include the new Equality Code of Conduct.

Cricketers

May 2020

Resurgence of the Black Lives Matter protests in response to the murder of George Floyd.

Black Lives matter Protests

July 2020

Former professional cricketers Ebony Rainford-Brent and Michael Holding shared their experiences of racism in a video broadcast by Sky Sports during the first day of England's Test match with the West Indies. This was followed by a series of other public statements, by a number of individuals across the game, expressing experiences of racism within cricket.

Ebony Rainford-Brent

May 2021

- Interviews for ICEC Commissioners held.

- Plans to install a commemoration of women’s cricket pioneer Rachel Heyhoe Flint at Lord's Cricket Ground were announced but reported to have been met with resistance from some MCC members.

Racheal Heyhoe

November 2021

The ICEC launches part one of its open call for evidence - a survey seeking lived experiences on diversity, inclusion and equity in cricket.

Evidence Image

March 2021

- Cindy Butts was announced as Chair of ICEC and began work to recruit Commissioners and set up ICEC infrastructure.

- Early Day Motion tabled in Parliament concerning the underrepresentation of African, Caribbean and Asian coaches, umpires and match officials at all levels of Cricket in England and Wales.

- The Equality and Human Rights Commission is called upon to conduct a formal investigation into allegations of racism in English Cricket.

Cindy Butts

July 2021

The ICEC’s appointed Commissioners and Terms of Reference are publicly announced.

ICEC Logo

December 2021

The ICEC launches part two of its open call for evidence seeking submissions from all interested parties across the game.

Cricket Match

Summer 2022

Report to be published and recommendations made to the ECB.

ECB

May 2020

Resurgence of the Black Lives Matter protests in response to the murder of George Floyd.

Black Lives matter Protests

June 2020

Former England Captain Clare Connor announced to become the MCC’s first female President in its 233 year history. She will take her position as the next President in October 2021.

Claire Connor

July 2020

Former professional cricketers Ebony Rainford-Brent and Michael Holding shared their experiences of racism in a video broadcast by Sky Sports during the first day of England's Test match with the West Indies. This was followed by a series of other public statements, by a number of individuals across the game, expressing experiences of racism within cricket.

Ebony Rainford-Brent

November 2020

ECB announces actions to be taken as part of their new Equality, Diversity and Inclusion Plan, including to establish the ICEC to make cricket more representative and tackle issues of discrimination. Other measures include the new Equality Code of Conduct.

Cricketers

March 2021

- Cindy Butts was announced as Chair of ICEC and began work to recruit Commissioners and set up ICEC infrastructure.

- Early Day Motion tabled in Parliament concerning the underrepresentation of African, Caribbean and Asian coaches, umpires and match officials at all levels of Cricket in England and Wales.

- The Equality and Human Rights Commission is called upon to conduct a formal investigation into allegations of racism in English Cricket.

Cindy Butts

May 2021

- Interviews for ICEC Commissioners held.

- Plans to install a commemoration of women’s cricket pioneer Rachel Heyhoe Flint at Lord's Cricket Ground were announced but reported to have been met with resistance from some MCC members.

Rachael Heyhoe

July 2021

The ICEC’s appointed Commissioners and Terms of Reference are publicly announced.

ICEC Logo

November 2021

The ICEC launches part one of its open call for evidence - a survey seeking lived experiences on diversity, inclusion and equity in cricket.

ICEC Logo

December 2021

The ICEC launches part two of its open call for evidence giving interested parties the opportunity to submit written evidence.

ICEC Logo

Summer 2022

Report to be published and recommendations made to the ECB.

ECB

News

18th November 2021

ICEC Latest Updates

ICEC Chair Cindy Butts makes a statement following the DCMS Select Committee hearing.

Read article

FAQs

If you are being commissioned by the ECB, how do you function independently?

We are an impartial Commission that is completely independent. We operate independently of the ECB and have complete autonomy with regards to setting our terms of reference, determining our research and evidence gathering priorities and making our findings and recommendations.

Who’s on the Commission?

Please see our About Us page detailing members of the commission.

How were Commissioners appointed?

Commissioners were appointed through an open and transparent recruitment process assisted by an external recruitment agency. Those interested were able to submit applications to be interviewed. Final decisions were made based on scores against the criteria in the recruitment brief seeking expertise in:

  • Cricket
    In-depth knowledge and experience of cricket in both the men’s and women’s game and for grassroots and professional level. A detailed understanding of cricket’s organisational and governance structures, including an understanding of cricket’s diverse stakeholder landscape.
  • Equality
    In-depth knowledge, experience and a track record of achievement across the full spectrum of diversity, inclusion and wider equalities, ideally with a focus on cricket or wider UK sports.
  • Organisational change
    A track record of working strategically with or within complex organisations or complex situations, to develop and improve systems and processes in an equalities context.

Commissioners were shortlisted and appointed by the ICEC Chair with the assistance of an independent external panel member providing recruitment support.

I have a complaint to make, will you investigate it?

The ICEC will not be able to investigate individual complaints.

Why do we need an Independent Commission investigating equity in cricket?

Cricket, as with all sports, should be a game that everybody can have fair access to and opportunities in. There have been a number of concerns, including allegations of racism and discrimination, raised about the game and how it is governed. There is also evidence of a lack of progression for Black and Asian players across talent pathways and limited diversity across multiple aspects of the game (i.e. leadership, coaching, umpires). The ICEC will independently seek and consider evidence on these matters and provide a safe vehicle for those involved in cricket to share their lived experiences without fear of reprisal. We will then make evidence based recommendations to the ECB about how to improve equity in cricket.

I’d like to give evidence, how do I submit this and how will it be used?

Once our call for evidence is open you will be able to submit evidence via our website. Evidence will be used to inform our final report and recommendations.

Can we give evidence confidentially?

Yes. It will be possible to provide evidence confidentially.

What will happen after the Commission finishes and has submitted their report?

The Independent Commission for Equity will end in summer 2022 and the report detailing our analysis and findings will be submitted to the ECB to determine how to take action on our recommendations.

Does the ECB have to take your advice and recommendations?

The ECB is not legally obliged to accept any or all our recommendations, however, given the ECB’s commitment to improving equity and learning from the lived experiences of those who have been subjected to unfair treatment, we are confident that the ECB will give serious consideration to our recommendations. The Commission expects the ECB to issue a formal and public response to our final report setting out whether they have accepted our recommendations and what action they plan to take in response.

Why are you focusing on race, gender and class?

The decision to focus primarily on race, gender and class was taken following an initial review of available research regarding equity issues in cricket. It was also informed by a series of initial interviews with stakeholders to seek their views about the most pressing issues needing attention.

Although it remains critical to address all areas of inequity the Commission has narrowed its scope given the constraints of a 12-month timeframe and the resources it has available. This focus will allow the Commission to examine these areas in depth and, as a result, have the most impact across both the men’s and women’s game. Our findings will also likely have beneficial applications for advancing other marginalised groups throughout the game of cricket.